Robin Yount and Paul Molitor

These two were teammates on the Brewers from 1978 through 1992. Molitor missed almost all of 1984, and about half of the strike-shortened 1981 season. Yount, aside from 1981, never played fewer than 100 games in a season. Despite Molitor coming up at a later age, playing designated hitter for a large portion of his career, and being injured more often than Yount, he stole 504 bases, compared to Yount’s 271 steals. They were in the All-Star game a total of just 9 times.

Yount and Molitor were the first two 3000 hit players to play a large part of their careers as teammates. Yount in particular seems to be little remembered: if you’re under 25 and not a Brewers fan, I don’t know that you have any real familiarity with him. Aside from his two MVP years, Yount didn’t have attention-getting seasons, he was not in the playoffs after 1982, and he hasn’t had a high profile in the 25 or so years since his playing days ended.

 

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Published in: Uncategorized on November 26, 2016 at 9:19 am  Comments (3)  

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. In my opinion Robin Yount, even though he has not kept a high profile was as good a player all in all as there was in baseball at that time. He was a threat both at bat and in the field..

  2. It always surprises me that, as great as they were in all other respects, Ruth & Gehrig were not 3,000-hit teammates.

    Yount is still more high-profile than Billy Williams, who is probably the most unknown modern-day Hall of Fame player. Yount at least took part in one memorable World Series.

  3. If you consider 4000 times on base the equivalent of 3000 hits-46 guys have reached base that many times-Gehrig and Ruth were apparently the first teammates to meet that bar.


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